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hopeazul:

Amazing Paper Art of Wet Canvas

cinemirrors:

Reservoir Dogs (1992) (Quentin Tarantino)

Pulp Fiction (1994) (Quentin Tarantino)

Inglourious Basterds (2009) (Quentin Tarantino)

Django Unchained (2012) (Quentin Tarantino)

(via hopeazul)

paperswallow:

Photographer Tom Hunter recreates classic paintings in modern, post industrial British settings.

(via hopeazul)

escapekit:

The work of Amy Hamilton

A graphic design student from Ontario, Canada. Amy has  a special interest in illustration and loves to experiment with different styles and mediums.

(Source: society6.com, via hopeazul)

magicforces:

The glorious work of Tyrus Wong is unparalleled. It was his lush pastels that served as the driving force behind Bambi, where he was the lead artist on the film. Prior to Wong’s contributions, the logistics of managing the detailed nuance of a forest setting (millions of leaves!) was posing a problem, but Wong’s gorgeous, inventive minimalist approach was the perfect solution and provides the film its unique style and warm, textured feel.

(via hopeazul)

latimespast:

"Only free men can negotiate. Your freedom and mine cannot be separated." —Nelson Mandela to then-South African President Pieter W. Botha, in 1985.

"Fellow South Africans, Nelson Mandela brought us together, and it is together that we will bid him farewell." —current South African President Jacob Zuma, announcing Mandela’s death today.

An article titled “8 Foes of Apartheid Get Life Terms in S. Africa" appeared in the L.A. Times on June 13, 1964. Here’s what the paper’s front page looked like on the day of Mandela’s release from prison, February 11, 1990. In December of that year, he spoke optimistically about South Africa’s future in this interview:

Q: What sort of South Africa do you envisage?

A: Very simple. It is a South Africa based on the Freedom Charter (a manifesto drawn up by the ANC and political allies in the 1950s), which is our basic policy; … a non-racial society where all population groups would enjoy equality before the law, and where all forms of racial discrimination were abolished. It is a South Africa where there will be a bill of rights defining the rights of citizens, a bill of rights that is entrenched by the ability of any person who considers his rights are threatened or violated to have access to an independent judiciary. It is a South Africa in which there will be political parties; where political dissent will not be dealt with in a way that shows a lack of patience and a lack of political tolerance.

Here’s Mandela’s obituary in the L.A. Times, by Deputy Managing Editor Scott Kraft, who covered Mandela as a reporter (you’ll see his byline more than once on the front page linked above); Deputy Washington Bureau Chief Bob Drogin, who described Mandela as “the most remarkable man I ever met” in a tweet today; and Johannesburg correspondent Robyn Dixon (who has also been covering today’s events on Twitter). More recommended reading: a timeline of Mandela’s life; a first-person account of growing up in a changing South Africa by Times photojournalist Jerome Adamstein; a recollection of his 1990 L.A. visit by columnist Patt Morrison; and Mandela’s own address to those assembled at a Cape Town rally upon his release from prison in February 1990. 

Top photo: Mandela and his then-wife Winnie, along with L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley, on the steps of City Hall during a trip to Los Angeles on June 29, 1990. Credit: Los Angeles Times

Middle photo: Mandela holds up the key to the city that he was presented by Mayor Bradley, also on June 29, 1990. Credit: Los Angeles Times

Bottom photo: Mandela visits L.A.’s First AME Church on July 9, 1993. Credit: Los Angeles Times. More photos from Mandela’s life.

(via latimes)

Blah

I am rather sad that tonight I am laying in bed rather than enjoying Lydia. I don’t really go to concerts that often. Which is rather a sad thought because, being in a band, I could use the inspiration. I have had a weird musical crush on that band for a while, and it just sounded fun. However, I did good things today. Work and family being the most important activities. Most importantly I got this cool keyboard. So stoked to treat my kindle like a poor man’s laptop; because I am a poor man. With debt now. MERICA.

BTW this will probably be all that I do now. Just ranting slightly about my day and my thoughts on the world.

hopeazul:

Amazing Paper Art of Wet Canvas

cinemirrors:

Reservoir Dogs (1992) (Quentin Tarantino)

Pulp Fiction (1994) (Quentin Tarantino)

Inglourious Basterds (2009) (Quentin Tarantino)

Django Unchained (2012) (Quentin Tarantino)

(via hopeazul)

(Source: bitterangst, via kirbyhehehehe)

(Source: ill-ary, via kirbyhehehehe)

(Source: iraffiruse, via kirbyhehehehe)

paperswallow:

Photographer Tom Hunter recreates classic paintings in modern, post industrial British settings.

(via hopeazul)

escapekit:

The work of Amy Hamilton

A graphic design student from Ontario, Canada. Amy has  a special interest in illustration and loves to experiment with different styles and mediums.

(Source: society6.com, via hopeazul)

magicforces:

The glorious work of Tyrus Wong is unparalleled. It was his lush pastels that served as the driving force behind Bambi, where he was the lead artist on the film. Prior to Wong’s contributions, the logistics of managing the detailed nuance of a forest setting (millions of leaves!) was posing a problem, but Wong’s gorgeous, inventive minimalist approach was the perfect solution and provides the film its unique style and warm, textured feel.

(via hopeazul)

latimespast:

"Only free men can negotiate. Your freedom and mine cannot be separated." —Nelson Mandela to then-South African President Pieter W. Botha, in 1985.

"Fellow South Africans, Nelson Mandela brought us together, and it is together that we will bid him farewell." —current South African President Jacob Zuma, announcing Mandela’s death today.

An article titled “8 Foes of Apartheid Get Life Terms in S. Africa" appeared in the L.A. Times on June 13, 1964. Here’s what the paper’s front page looked like on the day of Mandela’s release from prison, February 11, 1990. In December of that year, he spoke optimistically about South Africa’s future in this interview:

Q: What sort of South Africa do you envisage?

A: Very simple. It is a South Africa based on the Freedom Charter (a manifesto drawn up by the ANC and political allies in the 1950s), which is our basic policy; … a non-racial society where all population groups would enjoy equality before the law, and where all forms of racial discrimination were abolished. It is a South Africa where there will be a bill of rights defining the rights of citizens, a bill of rights that is entrenched by the ability of any person who considers his rights are threatened or violated to have access to an independent judiciary. It is a South Africa in which there will be political parties; where political dissent will not be dealt with in a way that shows a lack of patience and a lack of political tolerance.

Here’s Mandela’s obituary in the L.A. Times, by Deputy Managing Editor Scott Kraft, who covered Mandela as a reporter (you’ll see his byline more than once on the front page linked above); Deputy Washington Bureau Chief Bob Drogin, who described Mandela as “the most remarkable man I ever met” in a tweet today; and Johannesburg correspondent Robyn Dixon (who has also been covering today’s events on Twitter). More recommended reading: a timeline of Mandela’s life; a first-person account of growing up in a changing South Africa by Times photojournalist Jerome Adamstein; a recollection of his 1990 L.A. visit by columnist Patt Morrison; and Mandela’s own address to those assembled at a Cape Town rally upon his release from prison in February 1990. 

Top photo: Mandela and his then-wife Winnie, along with L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley, on the steps of City Hall during a trip to Los Angeles on June 29, 1990. Credit: Los Angeles Times

Middle photo: Mandela holds up the key to the city that he was presented by Mayor Bradley, also on June 29, 1990. Credit: Los Angeles Times

Bottom photo: Mandela visits L.A.’s First AME Church on July 9, 1993. Credit: Los Angeles Times. More photos from Mandela’s life.

(via latimes)

(via hopeazul)

Blah

I am rather sad that tonight I am laying in bed rather than enjoying Lydia. I don’t really go to concerts that often. Which is rather a sad thought because, being in a band, I could use the inspiration. I have had a weird musical crush on that band for a while, and it just sounded fun. However, I did good things today. Work and family being the most important activities. Most importantly I got this cool keyboard. So stoked to treat my kindle like a poor man’s laptop; because I am a poor man. With debt now. MERICA.

BTW this will probably be all that I do now. Just ranting slightly about my day and my thoughts on the world.

Blah

About:

A random assortment of mostly re-blogged materials, which I find appealing. Essentially the same blog everyone else does.

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